"No matter how terrified you may be, own your fear and take that leap anyway because whether you land on your feet or on your butt, the journey is well worth it."
-- Laurie Laliberte
"If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough."
-- Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage."
-- Anais Nin

Friday, July 9, 2010

Free Crochet Pattern: Big Girl Dish Scrubby


This pattern was inspired by my closest friend. She has three children (whom I adore) and seems to be constantly washing dishes. She uses kitchen sponges with one scrubby side for just about all of her kitchen cleaning. There are always two close at hand, one for washing dishes and one for wiping down surfaces. Following her example, I've adopted this practice.

The problem with these sponges is that they don't last very long. Once the "dish" sponge begins to wear, she throws out the "surface" sponge and replaces it with the old "dish" sponge. This practice serves two purposes: it saves her some money on sponges and it saves a bit of space in a landfill. Essentially she's throwing out one sponge when she could be throwing out two.

My issue is that cleaning with sponges doesn't always strike me as the most sanitary way of dealing with daily cleanup. Although we both pop the sponges in the microwave to kill whatever may be lurking, I still wonder what may be trapped in those sponges. Another concern is all those sponges. They're cheap and synthetic which means they don't decompose very quickly when they finally do reach the landfill.

That said, I offer you my kitchen scrubbie made of 100% cotton left over from another project.  You can throw it in the washer and dryer.  I plan to make enough for every day of the week and an extra just in case.
If you're not inclined to make one yourself, contact me.  I may choose to list them in my Etsy and/or Bonanzle shops. 

All instructions are in American crochet terms. I used worsted weight cotton and size 10 crochet cotton held together to make the example which measures about 4" x 5" x 3/8". This pattern has not been tested, so I welcome comments and questions. Please leave them here on this post so others can benefit from the answers as well.





You will need:
about 1 oz. worsted weight cotton yarn
equal length of size 10 crochet cotton
4.0 mm (size G-6) crochet hook
darning/yarn needle or smaller sized hook for weaving in ends

Design Note:  Most of this pattern is crocheted in rounds which is why the instructions specify "Row 1" but "Round 2."  You're working much of the pattern from the inside of the round, essentially making a tube that you will close with the last row (hence the instruction to work in the "inner loop only").  [Many thanks to my Ravelry pals for pointing out confusion with this technique.]

Ch 21

Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch to end, turn (20 sc)

Round 2: ch1, sc in back loop only to end of row, turn and sc in remaining loops of same row, join in inner loop only of 1st sc (40 sc)

Round 3: ch1, sc in inner loop only around, join in inner loop only of 1st sc

Round 4: repeat round 3

Round 5: ch1, *sc in inner loop only of sc, dc in inner loop only of next sc** repeat from * to ** to end, join in inner loop only of 1st sc (40 st)

Round 6: ch1, *dc in inner loop only of sc, sc in inner loop only of dc** repeat from * to ** to end, join in inner loop only of 1st dc (40 st)
Note: That is not a typo. This row is begun with a ch1 not a ch3.

Round 7: ch1, *sc in inner loop only of dc, dc in inner loop only of next sc** repeat from * to ** to end, join in inner loop only of 1st sc (40 st)

Rounds 8 - 9: repeat rounds 6 - 7

Round 10: ch1, sc in inner loop only around, join in 1st sc (40 sc)

Rounds 11 - 12: repeat round 10

Row 13: flatten piece, ch1, holding front and back sides together sc in all 4 loops of 1st and 40th sc, continue across to end, fo (20 sc)

Weave in ends.
Note: I weave the ends in for about 1" then leave a tail measuring about 2" inside the finished piece.



About my work
Any pattern I design and post here is my property. Please do not duplicate my patterns for any reason especially to sell. Instead, please link to my blog or to the pattern page when referencing one of my patterns.
You are more than welcome to offer finished items made from my patterns for sale. I see no reason why you should not profit from your hard work. However, I’d really appreciate it if you gave me credit for the design; please reference my blog or the pattern page.
If you do make any of my patterns, I’d love to see your finished items; please feel free to email pictures to me.
If you are not interested in making your own pieces, I occasionally offer finished items in my shops on Etsy and Bonanzle. I also welcome special orders, so email me and let’s work together.
BigGirlJewelry@yahoo.com

Added 10/17/14: I receive numerous questions regarding my patterns and I have one request for my readers. PLEASE, if you have a question, post it in the comments of the pattern to which it pertains, either here on the blog, or on Ravelry. That way, your questions and my answers are public and can benefit other crocheters. Sending me private emails doesn't do as much good. Thank you!

Happy Crocheting!

35 comments:

  1. I have to tell you, just reading through this pattern, that I've fallen in love with these! My best friend loves sponges, but does not like the sponge materials. I think that I'll be making her several of these and giving them as her Christmas present. Thank you!!!!!

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  2. Thanks for stopping by! Why not make her a towel to match while you're at it? Just sayin'. ;o)

    Just a tip: I have used this one to do dishes since I took the photos and the little extra you get from adding the crochet thread is worth the effort.

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  3. I'm late to the party with this one, but thank you, Angie! I would love for you to weigh in with a comment on my latest post. My dilemma is this: The Big Girl Pot Holder will be available here for free at the end of September, so what would you like to see next?

    http://biggirljewelry.blogspot.com/2010/09/hard-at-work-for-you.html

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    Replies
    1. I ordered from Hawaii Scrubber Yarn called Samsung Textile. It looks like the Eyelash yarn until you touch it! I don't know if I should add yarn with it or not as I can't find a pattern for it. I thought maybe you could help me.

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    2. Hi! I am completely unfamiliar with this yarn. My best guess would be to use it as-is if it's a scrubbie yarn.

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  4. love the pattern thanks for allowing us to sell the product. These will make great basket fillers for Christmas basket gifts.!

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  5. Hey Patty!

    That was actually how this pattern came to be. I've been obsessed with washcloths, dishcloths, and motif squares (to accompany gourmet soaps) for the past year, but the twashis I've found just didn't seem to cut it when it came to gift baskets. Looking at the kitchen sponges, I decided to have a go!

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  6. Hey, Love this and you are so right about the sponges! Getting ready to make one of these right now. :O)

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  7. Glad to hear it Sara! I'd love to see pics. If you send me one,I'll post it on the blog some time this month.

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Hey Jeanie! I'm guessing that since you removed your comment that you've already figured out the answer to your question, but I'm going to answer it anyway because I'm still getting emails with that question.

    I truly understand the confusion created by the direction "inner loop only" because it's really not something you see often, if ever. With this piece you are creating a tube that is closed at either end. The "inner loop" refers to the loop inside the tube. I used this wording because I feared that saying "back loop" would have you using the loop furthest to the back and "front loop" would have you using the loop closest to you. In either case, that would be the loop on the outside of the tube rather than the inside. I really hope this helps to further clarify the instruction. I certainly don't mind answering the question because, as I stated, it's not a common instruction found in crochet patterns.

    Happy Crocheting!

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  10. I really want to try this, but I haven't crocheted since my grandmother taught me when I was a very young girl. I'm not sure I will be able to follow the instructions. Do you ever post how-to videos?

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  11. I don't do videos for many reasons, not the least of which is debilitating stage fright. I can tell you that youtube has hundreds (if not thousands)of great crochet videos.

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  12. Ok thanks, I will check it out.

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  13. This is similar to potholder pattern my Mom taught me 70 years ago. We did all single crochet in the back stitch (yours is prettier.) Crochet round and round until you can bring the corners of the envelope together in the middle and kitchener stitch together. Will look different on each side. Pretty varigated colors. Sometimes she would stuff it for a small pillow.

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  14. Those are so cool, thank you for thinking it up, I'm going to make one tomorrow, I'll let you know how it turns out.

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  15. This would make a cute change purse.

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    Replies
    1. If you decide to make one, write up a tutorial and take pics. I'll post it here on the blog! (Personally, I really dislike sewing and have a terrible fear of zippers.)

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  16. I have just made my first "Big Girl Dish Scrubby" and was wondering if you had a specific reason for beginning the rounds after the first row rather than working both sides of the chain for the first round.

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    Replies
    1. Actually, yes I did. Two reasons in fact.

      1. Symmetry In order to close the tube, I use a row of sc to join one side to the other. I could have done that with a row of slip stitch or by stitching it shut, but I preferred the look of the sc because...

      2. When I tried using the chain as a foundation and working both sides, the design puffed open rather than laying flat like a sponge.

      Thank you for stopping by!

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    2. Thanks for the answer. I learned something without "re-inventing the wheel". Thanks for the pattern. I am going to love using my "sponge". I also plan to make a few for Christmas gifts this year.

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    3. I like using the various scrubbies in bath baskets with a nice body shampoo and lotion. It's a great 3-piece gift that doesn't break the bank.

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  17. Do you think this scrubby would work just as well with size 3 cotton?

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  18. That depends on exactly what you mean. If you're going to crochet the entire thing out of size 3 cotton, you'd want to do it with two strands held together. If you want to simply add texture, holding a size 3 cotton along with the worsted would add scrubby texture, but also a certain amount of bulk.

    I hope that helps.

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  19. Trying to figure out this pattern... think I'm getting it! So cute! I'm crocheting with white worsted weight cotton, and yellow #10 thread to add a bit of color. It's looking great so far! Thanks for sharing. ;)

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    Replies
    1. It takes a bit of figuring out, but once you get the hang of it, you'll see how simple it is. It was really hard to put into writing.

      Thank you for stopping by!

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  20. I don't see anything in the instructions about where/when to use the crochet cotton so I am just going to assume that you just double strand it throughout. If you could perhaps add in a note that would be awesome! I can't wait to start stash busting to make a bunch for Christmas gifts this year :)

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    Replies
    1. Hey Crystal! Yes, I just double strand throughout the pattern. Also, an idea from another pattern I saw on Ravelry (and that was suggested in an earlier comment) is to use one color of yarn and another of crochet cotton. I love the look!

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  21. Thank you so much for this pattern. My daughter has been wanting me to make her the "ultimate" dish cloth. To no avail, I was not able to make the right one until this pattern. This is the the ultimate dish cloth!! She loves it and so do I. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Hey Teresa! Thank you for taking a moment to say hello.

      A suggestion that came from a convo on Ravelry was to add a hanging loop so you can hang the wet scrubby and have it dry a bit faster. I think THAT will help make it the ultimate dish cloth.

      I suppose I didn't think of it sooner because I have enough of them that I just toss them all into a lingerie bag and throw them in the wash. I rarely use the same scrubby for more than a day.

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  22. I got an email question from CS this morning that I want to share here since I think it will benefit any newbies to crochet:

    "I would Love to crochet your kitchen sponge but do not understand how To go in the round
    Like on the first row. Is there a video somewhere showing me how to."

    First, the easier one to answer--No, I do not do videos and it's highly unlikely that I ever will. I do not post pictures or videos of myself online.

    Second--The first row of this project is stitched like a regular row of crochet. That's why it's labeled as a row. To make your Round 2, you stitch in the BACK LOOP ONLY all the way across, then turn. You're going to continue stitching into the sc from Row 1, now using the loops that were left over. When you get to the end of the round, join with a sl st and continue following the instructions from there.

    I hope that helps.

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  23. In one of the comments you mention a matching towel, would love to see the pattern. Where would I find it. Great gift for showers and holidays

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  24. Hello,
    I am reading the pattern and I feel like I am missing something. When is the crochet thread used?
    Thank you

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